Determine The Kind Of Appraiser You Want To Be

Two Types Of Appraisers; Which Do You Want To Be?Two types of appraisers’ certification are available in Pennsylvania:

A certified residential appraiser is qualified to appraise properties of between 1 and 4 residential units of any value or complexity, including vacant or unimproved land that is used for – or for which the highest and best use is for – 1-to-4 family purposes. A certified residential appraiser CANNOT appraise a subdivision where a development analysis or appraisal is necessary.

A certified general appraiser is qualified to appraise all types of property at any value.

Then, Complete The Necessary Additional Appraisal Courses

Once licensed appraiser trainees have completed the specified 75 hours of initial course work, and while obtaining required appraisal field experience, they simultaneously can continue to complete the remaining education necessary for certification.

To become as a certified residential appraiser, they will take a total of 200 classroom hours in the designated appraisal curriculum (below) outlined by the Appraisal Qualifications Board:

Basic Appraisal Principles, 30 hours;
Basic Appraisal Procedures, 30;
National USPAP Course, 15;
Residential Market Analysis and Highest-And-Best Use, 15;
Residential Site Valuation and Cost Approach, 15;
Residential Sales Comparison and Income Approaches, 30;
Residential Report Writing and Case Studies, 15;
Statistics, Modeling and Finance, 15;
Advanced Residential Applications and Case Studies, 15; and
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives, 20.

To become a certified general appraiser, 300 classroom hours:

Basic Appraisal Principles, 30 hours;
Basic Appraisal Procedures, 30;
National USPAP Course, 15;
Statistics, Modeling and Finance, 15;
General Market Analysis and Highest-And-Best Use, 30;
General Sales Comparison Approach, 30;
General Site Valuation and Cost Approach, 30;
General Income Approach, 60;
General Report Writing and Case Studies, 30; and
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives, 30.

Remember: A Bachelor’s Degree Or Better Also Is Required

Those who have yet to meet the Appraiser Qualifications Board‘s post-secondary education requirements of a bachelor’s or high degree from an accredited college or university by Jan. 1, 2015, may pursue completion of college or university classes while they also complete their field work and additional appraiser-related education.

Photo from Google Images